Updated 29 August 2016

Become a Basketball Official

All sports need officials to make the game fair and enjoyable for all. This is certainly true of a high-energy, fast-paced sport like basketball. The goal of a basketball official is to assure a game is played by the rules with no individual or team being placed at an advantage or disadvantage versus the opposing team. Additionally, the official needs to do this while being as "invisible" as possible - keeping control of the game while letting the players be the primary focus of the game.

This is sometimes a very difficult task, but often an enjoyable one for the players, the fans, and the officials. There is tremendous satisfaction in knowing you were able to officiate a fair game and see the play unfold into a great contest.

The officials in Board 44 are motivated to give to this great sport of basketball. Most played the sport at various levels and still love the game. Others may have children or relatives who played. In all cases, the members of Board 44 are dedicated officials with a professional attitude who are constantly striving to improve their game.

You can join us! All it takes is a desire to help the game of basketball, some study, and the motivation to constantly improve.


html5 video webm by EasyHtml5Video.com v1.7

Classes and Costs

Fall New Candidate Classes for the upcoming 2016-2017 Season

Classes are scheduled to coincide with the beginning of the next season.

Usually classes meet in late September, October and early November in the Fitchburg area.

Costs for the class includes classroom lectures, floor training, new candidates exam and dues for the current season.

Schedule, location, and exact costs for the next class will be determined in August or September.
Express your interest in officiating by emailing the Interpreter at interpreter@iaabo44.com.



Congratulations to the new class on passing the IAABO New Candidate Examination
and becoming members of IAABO and Board 44!

Candidates have passed the rules examination, floor practice and floor test.

These new basketball officials are now officiating in their first season


Classes for the 2016-2017 season will meet at the Fitchburg State University Recreation Center

Classes start Monday, September 26 and are all at 6:30pm

Other classes meet: Sept 24 & 29; Oct 3, 6, 10, 13, 17, 20, 24, and 27

IAABO Rules Test on November 3

For the 2016-17 season, cost for the lectures, floor training, and test is $250, which includes $110 Board 44 dues for the first year.


Frequently Asked Question

  • What are the requirements to become a basketball official?

    You must:

    1. Attend at least 10 of the 12 classroom sessions.
    2. Pass the written test with a grade of 86%. 43 out of 50 True/False questions.
    3. Attend floor practices and pass the floor test.
  • What is involved in the classroom portion of class and why is it so long?

    The entire rulebook for high school basketball as defined by the National Federation of High Schools is reviewed in preparation for the official's exam. This includes the obvious, like traveling, out-of-bounds, common and technical fouls, etc. and the not so obvious like specifications for playing areas, the lines, timing, scoring, the basket and backboard, uniforms and legal accessory apparel among other details.

  • What is involved in the floor practice?

    The classroom is where you learn the rules and the theory of officiating a game. The floor practices are the opportunity to learn how to apply all the theory. During floor practice, you will be guided on where to stand in each situation, what to look for, where to look, how to properly stop and start the clock, report violations and fouls, and generally communicate with your partners - the other officials including the scorer and timer(s).

    Officiating a basketball game is completely different from watching a game in the stands. Your vantage point is completely different, your focus is completely different, and your goals for the game are completely different. Getting comfortable with these new experiences is the goal of floor practice.

  • Who teaches the class?

    The Board Interpreter is responsible for teaching the class. Usually, the interpreter gets assistance from various experienced members.

    The Board Interpreter is designated as the "rules expert" on the board. The Interpreter helps members of the board better understand the more subtle elements of the rules and mechanics of the game. Also, the Interpreter reviews areas he or she and the Executive Committee feel need more emphasis with the membership.


Interested? Contact our Interpreter at interpreter@iaabo44.com

Get your name on the Intepreter's mailing list and keep informed of future classes